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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
ion of the states of... california florida, illinois... and new york. and by the united states department of education... and the united states immigration and naturalization service. so, how was your weekend ? what weekend ? bill spent the whole time working, and i did laundry. that sounds romantic. he
california to the new york island, from the redwood forest, and to the gulf stream waters, this land is made for you and me ibidem at a special on the life and politics of woody guthrie. born 100 years ago on july 14 1912 in oklahoma, we speak with british protest singer billy bragg and will coffman. >> history has a habit of repeating itself every now and then and the songs that he was riding in the 1930's an 1940's and 50's can often have an amazing relevance for what is going on now. i think it is about time people started listening to woody guthrie again. >> and we hear the legendary folk singer pete seeger describe his first meeting with woody guthrie. >> he took over for 20 minutes and entranced everybody. i come from oklahoma, you know. it is a rich state. if you want lead, we have lead. if you want coal, we have coal in oklahoma. >> woody guthrie. all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. amy goodman: commemorations are being held across the country this year to mark the hundredth anniversary of the birth of one
that lies beneath the entire state of california. this is all the more surprising because before its settlement, low rainfall made most of this region a virtual desert. the coastal plain of southern california, of which orange county is a part, is particularly well suited for, uh, groundwater storage. it has several things going for it. a--it's very deep, some 4,000 feet deep, uh, to, uh... all containing fresh water, of which we only use about the upper 1,500 feet. it has a, uh... surface water supply. it's the only perennial stream in southern california. the--this stream is fed by-- by snow melt in a very large mountain range behind us. again, in a desert area, we have snow that feeds a perennial river system which provides continuous water supply. another factor that helps out a great deal in maintaining the flow of the water down this river is the fact that we have considerable residential and commercial development upstream of us, which, uh, provides us waters of waste-water origin. that means the water has gone through a treatment plant once upstream and has gone through a ser
from southern california. ud. no es española, ¿verdad? no, no. soy de los estados unidos. why is raquel here? ( timbre suena ) what has brought her to spain... and to sevilla? ( timbre suena ) esta señorita busca a la abuela. ( campanas suenan ) raquel: esta carta... se le escribió la señora suárez a mi cliente, don fernando castillo. mi cliente, don fernando, vive en méxico. está gravemente enfermo. antes de la guerra civil conoció a una mujer joven y bella-- rosario. rosario era amiga de teresa suárez. don fernando siempre creyó que rosario había muerto en la guerra pero la señora suárez dice que no y además, don fernando cree que tiene un hijo con rosario. ¿sabe ud. algo de esto? todo esto es nuevo para mí. ¿la señora suárez nunca le habló de rosario o de don rnando? no... nunca... jamás. and so raquel must now talk to miguel ruiz, elena's husband and son of teresa suárez. hola, elena. este es mi esposo, miguel ruiz. mucho gusto, miguel. mucho gusto. ¿qué va a tomar? ¿un vino? ¿una cerveza? aquí sirven un fino estupendo. raquel: ¿un fino? sí, el jerez es u
by proposition in california and this is an example of when it's a really bad idea and i am certainly not going to vote yes on f. i am opposed to it. >> all right. ms. gavin. >> i am opposed to f and it's too expensive to implement and where in the world would our water from and -- good intengses and i think f is going the wrong way and i think that other municipalities buy water from us so we have to think of them also. where are they going to get their water from and where are we going to get our water from? so i say no to f. >> all right. mr. lagos. >> i agree with everyone and on the grounds it's too costly and if it's not needed. if it's not broken you don't have to fix it and i would vote no on f and in my opinion possibly a cynical ploy to privatize water distribution to san francisco, so i would definitely oppose it. >> thank you sir. mr. rogers. >> i too say no on f and the assumption with this proposition is that it would be torn down. they're studying it, so they're trying to plan or justify a reason to tear down the hetch hetchy dam and i think it's a bad idea. they have oth
talking extensively about a commercial tax rent. commercial property owners in the state of california have been on a tax holiday since prop 13 and under the reagan and bush eras. and we could use that revenue to fund our public schools and restore jtor city college. >> thank you, miss selby. >> two of the things that are being done this november and i would love for to you vote for both of them, 30 and 38. those are two measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is som
will be true and strong ♪ ♪ you don't have to tell me that... ♪ so where exactly are you going? california. san francisco. you're kidding. no. why do you think i'm kidding? because i'm from san francisco. that's where i live. really? what a coincidence. isn't it? small world. so what are you going to do in san francisco? i got accepted to the san francisco college of music. oh. and what do you want to do when you finish music school? well, i hope to be a songwriter. what kind of songs do you write? folk and pop with a little jazz influence. i can't believe you're moving to san francisco. i know. alberto, do you know what this is? alberto: that is a dream catcher. what's a dream catcher? well, according to native american legend, if you place a dream catcher over your bed at night, it catches all the bad dreams and it lets in only the good ones. how wonderful. we all need a dream catcher in our lives. ( cash register opens ) let's see. parts... labor... and, oh yeah, there's the towing. i had hoped to be on my way to san francisco by now. god, this feels like a bad dream. yeah, where's that drea
college of music. san francisco? that's right. san francisco, california. rebecca! but rebecca, this school is on the other side of the country. i know that, but if san francisco accepts me and gives me some financial aid, that's where i'm going. but you don't know a soul out there. yes, i do. my godmother lives out there. what, is she rich or something? she has such a big house. no, she's not rich, but she does have a room for me if i get accepted. you're really serious about this, aren't you? dead serious. ( knock at door ) come in. when do we eat? in five minutes. dinner's in the oven. dad's not eating. he went to bed. what's wrong? is he sick? no. he just said he was tired. so, did you hear anything about your applications? you know, to music school? i got three rejection letters. that's too bad. so, what're you going to do? i still have one last hope... a school in san francisco. san francisco... aw... rebecca: dad, what? are you o.k.? no! the red sox lost another game. dad, you make me crazy. is my purse out there? yeah. it's here. what's this? a college brochure. see you
of... california, florida, illinois... and new york. and by the united states department of education... and the united states immigration and naturalization service. pero hace mucho tiempo que no vuelvo a méxico. méxico ha cambiado mucho. ¿ cuánto tiempo se van a quedar por aquí ? volveremos a méxico en dos semanas. i ay, saluden a todos de mi parte ! claro que sí. fue un gusto verte. adiós. adiós. adiós. it's all yours. ¿ qué quieren ustedes, por favor ? i'll have an omelet with mushrooms and tomatoes. i'll have pancakes with a side of scrambled eggs. coming right up. congratulations, katherine. i almost understood what you were saying. very funny. it seems like only yesterday that you came here looking for a job. i still remember how confident you were. that wasn't confidence, it was desperation. well, i don't know how we're going to get along without you. oh, but we'll find a way. seriously, katherine, what are you going to do ? well, one thing's for sure-- i'm going to spend a lot more time with my kids; bill wants me to help him with his business projects; and i want
-- migrate to the u.s. about half of them movemanently. moichoacanos cly live miin california, tex abanhen illinotanme movemanently. so witborders thaton't sp mexins, let alone terrorts, many starting to ask "is ere betterolicy? in theatmecasuegioofentral amea inmetheir populationclese aca has coapseanthenoomeistsand rey without enough land for their rising numbers, sociphgrows, including -uan migratiooverioe. in the highlands of guatemala, weary maya indians welcome a truce, following the peace accords of 1996. a victim of the violence wa, who lives in this house compound with her surviving grandchildren and their families. the pipes that carry this wate t village were an innovation brought by her son. lso leefs touild aoad aspeakingocalanguager)h. translator: wanting those kinds of thingss in the eyes of certain people. it caused mors to go aroun that he's onoing in the ethat good work people. because he's a member of the gueilla organization. naator:the organizan was caolicction. his son, diego, was too young to remember his father a grandfather whenaramilitaries entered his compound in
products sector. the st common treeere now is the radiata, or monterey pine, imported from california 30 years ago. unr the right condions, radia pines the fastt growg trs the world, because unlike other trees, they continue to grow all year round. they like it damp, and they won't grow where it is too hot or too cold. that leaves out most places. but with much ideal habitat, chile's south-central coast is now world's by 2000, chile harvested moreha mlion cuc mersf afor cn for wood pulp to mceulose. japa. ddespite japan's economic stagnation, and the asian crisis of the late '90s. fish, too, are an important primary product. whether netted in the pacific or raised on commercial farms, thpp u. anasian consume. t sh and lumber could come from many places around thelobe, and they can be shippedume. t sh at any time of year,e so chile tried to nd another economic advantage. the solution emerged at a global scale. most of the planet's land mass and population are in the northern hemisphere. half a wor away, chile sought to exploit the biggest difference to life in the southern hemisphere.her
of the states of... california florida, illinois... and new york. and by the united states department of education... and the united states immigration and naturalization service. looks like henry's crashed through this door one too many times. i think i can probably fix the hinge. i'll be right back. excuse me. yes, mrs. gilroy. can i help you ? this dish, the monterey chicken. yes ? i had it and it was delicious ! i brought my friend so she could try it. - i'm so glad you enjoyed it. - well, actually, it doesn't taste the way it did before. oh. i see. i'll tell the substitute chef. substitute chef ? maybe that's the problem. yeah, with rosa gone things aren't quite the same. - who's rosa ? - she's the regular chef. the one who makes the monterey chicken. - well, you seem to know lot about this place. - i'm rosa's biggest fan. - the chef who just quit ? - rosa quit ? - she sure did. - rosa quit. did he say rosa quit ? yeah, rosa quit. but everybody seemed so happy when i was here last week. oh, no, no, no. you don't understa. she just had to go-- ah,
susceptible to farmland loss. he finds that densely-populated farming regions, like those in california and florida, are particularly threatened by suburban growth. thoumericareot angeofoi some of the best agricultural land in the world. once developed, it's almost impossible to return in the chicago area, rmers are not the only ones alarmed by the rapid growth. margot brown is concerned that traicike could soonon its way developis going to belyat t w e h littlwn of marengo.owow greo d ity of lif margot brown is concerned are gointoape could soonon its way narrator: devethe irony is the threat w e to margot's quality of life greo is created by other people just like her. she and michael used to live in schaumburg, t itas toowdedo mangoanund brown: what we han mao that was space, peace and quiet, d pretty much everything i need is at my fingertips. nathamic d people want peace and quiet, along with shorter commutes and continued access to the conveniences of modern life. edmonds: everybody is convenience-driven. and we want to have everything at our fingertips. u're seeinthis migration a
three of the suspects were detained in california last week while the fourth was seized in afghanistan. they are accused of planning to meet without, militants to carry out attacks in afghanistan or yemen. dozens of undocumented college students marched tuesday to the office of kansas secretary of state kris kovach to demand he focus on his state level job instead of the anti-immigrant crackdowns across the nation. his credited with the anti- immigrant laws in arizona and alabama and continue to litigate issues related to immigration and other states. on his website, he refers to myself as a "defender of cities and states that fight illegal immigration." secretary of state kobach father lawsuit challenging president obama is deferred action program that provides temporary relief to some undocumented young people. on tuesday, students from kansas and arizona delivered a letter calling on the secretary of state to focus on his state job or resign. a 13-year-old girl was shot and killed in miami on tuesday while riding on a private bus to school. the shooting occurred in front of the vict
playing) captioned by real-time captioning van nuys, california. annenberg media ♪ and: with additional funding from these foundations and individuals: and by: and the annual financial support of: to order videocassettes for information about this and other annenberg media programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org. annenberg media ♪ and: with additional funding from these foundations and individuals: and by: and the annual financial support of: ♪ (theatrical music playing) movies are the culture of the 20th century. they have affected people in everything, from determining how they dream ... to how they kiss. so much of moviemaking is moving the audience's eye. when are we going move it? how are we going to move it? what do we want them to see? (bell ringing) it's very important to watch every detail in a film, particularly with a director like fritz lang, who's not going to leave anything up to chance. everything is calculated. ♪ (dramatic music plays) no, johnny! no. well ... maybe. (narrator) never has a woman been more beautifully brutal. oh, i'm sorry i can'
of california-san francisco, hastings college of law, [wo-uflt/] and our media partner sfgtv. we're fortunate to have such an impressive field of candidates. i will begin with the questions. the first question is for miss breed. mr. davis, and mr. resignato. and for the benefit of the audience, i will also project the questions on the screen. please explain your position on whether or under what conditions the san francisco parks and recreation department should be parented to lease park facilitis to food vendors and other commercial enterprises? miss breed? >> hi. london breed. i think that what we see now in the recreation -- i'm sorry, what is the time limit on each of these questions? >> one minute, please. >> i think what we see now is a bit of an abuse in terms of the number of vendors that the city has leased space to in our parks. and parks and recreation is for parks and recreation and not necessarily should be a place where we are leasing space to more vendors than we particularly need in specific areas. there is a place for vendors, for food vendors for various vendors in cert
. a california woman has been fired from her job after using a racial slur against president obama on facebook and writing, maybe he will get assassinated this term denise helms later explained her comments in an interview. >> the assassination part is harsh. i am not saying that i would do that, not by any means, but if it was to happen, i would not care one bit. >> the post was part a barrage of racist references to president obama on social media following his re-election last week. republican tea party member alan westin is unwilling to can see defeat to patrick murphy, even though the state of florida says that he lost. election officials in one county are reportedly recounting some early votes. on friday, a florida judge denied a request to impound ballots and voting machines. the supreme court has announced it will hear challenges to a key provision on the landmark voting rights act of 1965. the case centers on a section of the law that requires many state and local governments with a history of discrimination to get federal approval before altering voting procedures. the money transfer
, in southern california and in many other areas as well, there are seasonal fluctuations in the lake level. typically, lake levels are low in the summer, but whatever season they're low, earth-moving equipment can come in and excavate these sands from the dry foreshore area. the foreshore deltas in these reservoirs contain most of the beach-size sand, and these will be high and dry when lake levels are low. so they can be collected with standard earth-moving equipment and trucked directly to the beach or reintroduced to the stream beds downstream. if there is technology and engineering available for transporting sand around dams, why isn't this being done? one reason may be that many scientists originally rejected the idea that dams actually contribute to erosion. but that is no longer the case. the problem currently seems to be that the value of sand as a coastal resource may still not be fully recognized. a lot of this sand is already excavated by sand and gravel companies for construction material. it should be treated as a public resource and a fair market value paid for it. for instan
of the same coin. if you go to stanford, california, you'll see the stanford linear accelerator. you're driving down the freeway 280, there's a great big long concrete tube, two miles long. and that concrete two-mile-long tube, they fire electrons. and these electrons go right down a vacuum pipe. gotta get all the air away, they don't want to get these electrons to get obstructed. and they'll fire for two miles down that tube. and when they get to the end, boom, they smatter into particles of matter and they smash it all apart and they take a look to see what it's made of. for example if i wanna know what this watch is made of, the one way to find out what this watch is made of is to take the watch, find a concrete wall, take that watch and throw it as fast as i can. and when it splatters, take some pictures, quick. and that way i can find out what's inside. does that make sense? well, that's what the phys-ers do. they do that with atoms and they smash them apart and they see all the debris. they take photographs and they get it. well, that's what the people do at the stanford linear
victims. leslie bernstein: we have a program here at the university of southern california called the cancer surveillance program. this is one of a number of population based cancer registries around the country. a population based cancer registry defines geographic boundaries of a population and then collects information on cancer that develops in the population living within that geographic boundary. in the late 1970s, brian henderson was working at a mission hospital in new guinea when the chinese government asked him to be a consultant on cancer. dr. henderson: premiere zhou en lai had bladder cancer. in the course of his illness, he became interested in cancer and actually was a mover in getting a national register of cancer cases. a million barefoot doctors in every village in china recorded every cause of death. and then, the chinese, using relatively unsophisticated computer technology made maps of the distribution of cancer. they knew where concentrations of cancer victims were located, but not why. why was there more stomach cancer in certain parts of the country... more
>> coming up on "california country," meet one of the hardest-working couples in the restaurant and ranching worlds. >> they're both, uh, 24/7, 7-day-a-week business, which most people think we're crazy for jumping into these 2 businesses. >> next find out about a wine that's been generations in the making. >> when i come visit in california, 1966, i say, "that's the place i'm gonna stay and i die." >> then discover a blooming business in southern california. >> and the flowers, it's just smiles. >> and saddle up as we take a step--or in this case, a stitch--back in time. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] welcome to "california country." i'm tracy sellers. we're at a really unique restaurant today. it's half-city, half-country, and all the idea of one even more unique couple. part chefs, part greeters, even part busboys, ron and his wife terri gilliland do a little bit of everything at their wildly popular roxy restaurant in sacramento. >> uh, it's nice to be able to wear different hats and not be tied down to the
. yeah! go to mypyramid.gov to find out more. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> coming up on "california country," learn how one woman is soaring with a sour fruit. >> they make everything taste a meyer lemon in tastes better because it has a meyer lemon in it. >> then it's a delta favorite. learn why these spears are so special and why they'll have you singing for your supper. >> [singing in italian] >> then it's time to stop and smell and eat the roses at this unique farm. it's all ahead, and it starts now. welcome to "california country." i'm your host, tracy sellers. we're in the bay area today, enjoying a sweet taste of success, and ironically it's all based on one sour little fruit. if you've never tried a meyer lemon, then you may just be in the minority these days. softer, juicier, and sweeter than your common household eureka lemon, the meyer has quickly built a devoted following and one that includes karen morss. she is the epitome of the statement "when life hands you lemons, make lemonade," but in her case, she took it a step further an
>> coming up on "california country": think this sweet treat just can't get any better? think again. >> oh, my! it's ready. >> it's ready? >> it's ready. >> then find out why this meal was 52 weeks in the making. >> i would like you to know that this morning at the farmers' market, we purchased everything that you're gonna have for dinner tonight. >> next, learn the hidden ranching roots behind hearst castle. and they're a summertime favorite--see what you can do with some of the season's best frt. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> ♪ la la la la la la da da da da... ♪ >> here at birk's restaurant in santa clara, they're known for being a south bay institution. since 1989, plate after heaping plate has been served up to a pretty discriminating crowd. and no matter how full they are, most leave room for dessert, desserts that are almost too pretty to eat--almost. >> here we have the orange- creamsicle-flavored ice cream. it sits on a carved-out half of a navel orange. so here is our desserts for our v.i.p. table,
. ♪ get up, get up, get up [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> coming up on "california country"...meet the face of andy boy produce. yes, there really is an andy boy. >> who is this? >> yep. it's me. >> oh. >> then she's getting her goat, but that's a good thing for this talented farmer. >> you see how comfortable the baby is? you can't carry the big one. >> then as the weather heats up, it's time to get gardening and our expert has the tips to get you started. >> think of the best salsa you've ever had. it was the fresh cilantro, wasn't it? >> it's all ahead and it starts now. take a walk through your average produce aisle these days and there are more choices than ever, but one farm has very eye-catching marketing strategy to entice you. and it all has to do with the bright picture of a little boy named andy. but have you ever stopped to wonder, who is this andy boy guy anyway? >> andy boy's my father, andy d'arrigo, he's the face on the label and a lot of people ask, is there an andy boy and i say, yes, there is. >> who is this? >> yep. i
ramón? se llama fernando, fernando castillo. ¿vive don fernando en california o vive en méxico? don fernando vive en méxico, en una hacienda. la hacienda es muy importante para don fernando. es un símbolo para él. ¿cómo se llama la hacienda? ¿recuerdan? la hacienda se llama la gavia. la gavia es una hacienda muy vieja de la época colonial. bueno, también en este episodio hay dos personas muy importantes. ¿quién es esta persona? ¿se llama ramón o se llama juan? se llama ramón. la otra persona importante que forma parte de esta historia es una mujer. ¿cómo se llama ella? se llama mercedes. también hay otras dos personas en esta historia que son importantes: este hombre... y este hombre. en el 7ximo episodio, tendremos más información sobre don fernando, mercedes, carlos, juan y ramón. por el momento, eso es todo. ah, pero ustedes no saben nada de mí, ¿verdad? me llamo raquel rodríguez. vivo en los angeles, california. soy méxicoamericana y soy abogada. bueno, ahora, ¿es cierto o falso? soy cubanoamericana. soy profesora. vivo en los angeles, california. bueno,
a voltage difference. you know what i'm saying? yeah. hey, something happened in california sometime ago. well, this over 10 years now. you guys you know what a cherry picker is? it's a truck that's got a boom that goes way up and service the wires. well, it turns out, up near lake tahoe, they had a storm and some of the wires went out. they sent the cherry picker up. and the cherry picker went up there and repairing the wires and everything. all of a sudden, it slipped in the mud-- [grunts] --and shorted right against the wires. and the whole thing is more than 100,000 volts. the whole thing-- and there's a guy up there. and the guy is sitting in there, and guess what his potential is, what his voltage is? something like a hundred, maybe 120,000. he's the same high voltage, but he's okay, 'cause every part of his body, all right? now it turns out that you're not supposed to drink on the job. that he had been drinking beer. you people be knowing what happens after you drink some beer? what you gotta do? he had to go to the bathroom. but there's no bathroom up there. now, he's certainly--
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)